VRL an eye

Mosaicking based local image processing

People

Dmitry V. Fedorov, Baris Sumengen, B.S. Manjunath

Objective

Here we present a framework for various local image processing. Locality is achieved by using tiles and novelty is in the way the tiles are assembled back together to constitute an image. Our approach is robust to acquisition parameters and temporal changes. Since we blend the images using pixel data from the spatial domain (as opposed to fusing the information in a transform domain), the resulting images have fewer artifacts. The results presented for microscopy and hand held consumer cameras demonstrate good quality and computational efficiency. Different applications of our approach are presented in the following.

High Dynamic Range imaging and compression

Dynamic range of modern aquisition systems is lower than the one of human beings. It's usual that certain objects appear too bright or even saturated and other objects are not visible because of darkness depending on the camera settings. Our framework for image processing using local information provides a solution combining images taken at different exposures and compressing them to the desired Dynamic Range. more...

» Examples

Multi-focus imaging

One of the fundamental limitations of modern optic systems is the low depth-of-field. Usually, certain objects at particular distance are focused while other objects are blurred to a degree depending on their distances from the camera. Our framework for image processing using local information provides a solution. The results presented for microscopy and hand held consumer cameras demonstrate good quality and computational efficiency. more...

» Examples

Local image enhancement and Dynamic Range Compression

One of very common problems in microscopy is uneven illumination. Another problem is that dynamic range of modern systems employed for biomedical imagery is usually higher than the dynamic range of standard screen display devices used. This discrepancy leads to the problem in the tone mapping from the acquired high dynamic range (HDR) into the lower dynamic range (LDR) of print or screen. more...

» Examples

Acknowledgements

This project is supported by the NSF Information Technology Research grant #0331697.